The Phantom World: Philosophy of Spirits , Apparitions
by Augustin Calmet (1850)

Contents of the First Volume:   

I. The Appearance of Good Angels proved by the Books of the Old Testament

II. The Appearance of Good Angels proved by the Books of the New Testament

III. Under what form have Good Angels appeared 

IV. Opinions of the Jews, Christians, Mahometans, and Oriental Nations, concerning the Apparitions of Good Angels

V. Opinion of the Greeks and Romans on the Apparitions of Good Genii

VI. The Apparition of Bad Angels proved by the Holy Scriptures — Under what Form they have appeared

VII. Of Magic

VIII. Objections to the Reality of Magic

IX. Reply to the Objections

X. Examination of the Affair of Hocque, Magician 

XL. Magic of the Egyptians and Chaldeans

XII. Magic among the Greeks and Romans

XIII. Examples which prove the Reality of Magic

XIV. Effects of Magic according to the Poets

XY. Of the Pagan Oracles 

XVI. The Certainty of the Event predicted, not always a proof that the Prediction conies from God

XVII. Reasons which lead us to believe that the greater part of the Ancient Oracles were only Impositions of the Priests and Priestesses, who feigned that they were inspired by God

XVIII. Of Sorcerers and Sorceresses, or Witches

XIX. Instances of Sorcerers and “Witches being, as they said, transported to the Sabbath

XX. Story of Louis Gaufredi and Magdalen de la Palud, owned by themselves to be a Sorcerer and Sorceress

XXI. Reasons which prove the Possibility of Sorcerers and Witches being transported to the Sabbath

XXII. Continuation of the same Subject

XXIII. Obsession and Possession of the Devil

XXIV. The Truth and Reality of Possession and Obsession by the Devil proved from Scripture

XXV. Examples of Real Possessions caused by the Devil

XXVI. Continuation of the same Subject

XXVII. Objections against the Obsessions and Possessions of the Demon — Reply to the Objections

XXVIII. Continuation of Objections against Possessions and some Replies to those Objections

XXIX. Of Familiar Spirits

XXX. Some other Examples of Elves

XXXI. Spirits that keep watch over Treasure

XXXII. Other instances of Hidden Treasures, which were guarded by Good or Bad Spirits

XXXIII. Spectres which appear, and predict things unknown and to come

XXXIV. Other Apparitions of Spectres 230

XXXV. Examination of the Apparition of a pretended Spectre

XXXVI. Of Spectres which haunt Houses

XXXYIL Other Instances of Spectres which haunt certain Houses 

XXXYIII. Prodigious effects of Imagination in those Men or Women who believe they hold Intercourse with the Demon

XXXIX. Eeturn and Apparitions of Souls after the Death of the Body, proved from Scripture

XL. Apparitions of Spirits proved from History

XLI. More Instances of Apparitions

XLII. On the Apparitions of Spirits who imprint their Hands on Clothes or on Wood

XLIII. Opinions of the Jews, Greeks, and Latins, concerning the Dead who are left unburied

XLIV. Examination of what is required or revealed to the Living by the Dead who return to Earth  

XLV. Apparitions of Men still alive, to other living Men, absent, and very distant from each other

XLVI. Arguments concerning Apparitions 

XLVII. Objections against Apparitions, and Keplies to those Objections

XLVIII. Some other Objections and Replies 

XLIX. The Secrets of Physics and Chemistry taken for supernatural things 

L. Conclusion of the Treatise on Apparitions

LI. Way of explaining Apparitions 

LII. The difficulty of explaining the manner in which Apparitions make their appearance, whatever system may be proposed on the subject

Brian Jungen

Skull
2006–2009
Mixed Media: Baseballs, softballs, 18.4 x 15.2 x 25.4 cm

Alexey Titarenko
Saint Petersburg (1992–94)Gelatin silver prints  Alexey Titarenko
Saint Petersburg (1992–94)Gelatin silver prints  Alexey Titarenko
Saint Petersburg (1992–94)Gelatin silver prints 

Alexey Titarenko

Saint Petersburg (1992–94)
Gelatin silver prints 

Marisol

The Family (1969)
Wood, plastic, neon, glass

studiomuseum:

Wangechi Mutu: A Fantastic Journey at Nasher Museum at Duke University | March 21 - July 21, 2013
Images (from top): Once upon a time she said, I’m not afraid and her enemies became afraid of her The End (2013) / Yo Mama (2003) / Misguided Little Unforgivable Hierarchies (2005) /  (L to R): Riding Death in My Sleep (2002) / Root of All Eves (2010) / The Bride Who Married a Camel’s Head (2009)
studiomuseum:

Wangechi Mutu: A Fantastic Journey at Nasher Museum at Duke University | March 21 - July 21, 2013
Images (from top): Once upon a time she said, I’m not afraid and her enemies became afraid of her The End (2013) / Yo Mama (2003) / Misguided Little Unforgivable Hierarchies (2005) /  (L to R): Riding Death in My Sleep (2002) / Root of All Eves (2010) / The Bride Who Married a Camel’s Head (2009)
studiomuseum:

Wangechi Mutu: A Fantastic Journey at Nasher Museum at Duke University | March 21 - July 21, 2013
Images (from top): Once upon a time she said, I’m not afraid and her enemies became afraid of her The End (2013) / Yo Mama (2003) / Misguided Little Unforgivable Hierarchies (2005) /  (L to R): Riding Death in My Sleep (2002) / Root of All Eves (2010) / The Bride Who Married a Camel’s Head (2009)
studiomuseum:

Wangechi Mutu: A Fantastic Journey at Nasher Museum at Duke University | March 21 - July 21, 2013
Images (from top): Once upon a time she said, I’m not afraid and her enemies became afraid of her The End (2013) / Yo Mama (2003) / Misguided Little Unforgivable Hierarchies (2005) /  (L to R): Riding Death in My Sleep (2002) / Root of All Eves (2010) / The Bride Who Married a Camel’s Head (2009)
studiomuseum:

Wangechi Mutu: A Fantastic Journey at Nasher Museum at Duke University | March 21 - July 21, 2013
Images (from top): Once upon a time she said, I’m not afraid and her enemies became afraid of her The End (2013) / Yo Mama (2003) / Misguided Little Unforgivable Hierarchies (2005) /  (L to R): Riding Death in My Sleep (2002) / Root of All Eves (2010) / The Bride Who Married a Camel’s Head (2009)
studiomuseum:

Wangechi Mutu: A Fantastic Journey at Nasher Museum at Duke University | March 21 - July 21, 2013
Images (from top): Once upon a time she said, I’m not afraid and her enemies became afraid of her The End (2013) / Yo Mama (2003) / Misguided Little Unforgivable Hierarchies (2005) /  (L to R): Riding Death in My Sleep (2002) / Root of All Eves (2010) / The Bride Who Married a Camel’s Head (2009)

studiomuseum:

Wangechi Mutu: A Fantastic Journey at Nasher Museum at Duke University | March 21 - July 21, 2013

Images (from top): Once upon a time she said, I’m not afraid and her enemies became afraid of her The End (2013) / Yo Mama (2003) / Misguided Little Unforgivable Hierarchies (2005) /  (L to R): Riding Death in My Sleep (2002) / Root of All Eves (2010) / The Bride Who Married a Camel’s Head (2009)

(via quirkyblackgirls)

Karen Miranda-Rivadeneira

Mom curing me from the evil eye circa 1990.

Abdul Mati Klarwein

Bavarian Angel (1970)
Mische technique (layers of oil and tempera on primed canvas)

50 x 50 cm

explore-blog:

If you read one thing this week, make it this 1977 interview with the timelessly wise Maya Angelou on identity and the meaning of life

From “Hair in African Art and Sculpture" (PDF), African Arts

Crest mask. Cross River, Calabar area, Nigeria. 
Collection of Toby and Barry Hecht. 

"I have been engaged in some recent debates concerning the possible relationship between ancient Egyptians and modern West African cultures. In the midst of the discussion I presented some images for comparison of West African art sculptures that resemble the Bes figure of ancient Egypt. In the midst of this debate I noticed something about the figures that may make an even stronger case for cross continental and cultural influence. If it wasn’t for the debate I probably wouldn’t have noticed this.

What concerns us in this discussion are the poses of the West African figures and what they could possibly mean in our ancient Egyptian figure of Bes and other Egyptian sculptures. Although the figures that were displayed in the initial discussion were from Egypt, Nigeria and Cameroon, the possible meaning of the poses may actually come from the Kongo in central Africa. I will begin by discussing the Kongo figure of the Nkisi Nkondi as a foundation for our discussion….”

Raymond Hains (1926–2005)
01. Untitled (1960)MixedMedia: torn posters on reclaimed metal plate
02. Palissade (1974)Mixed Media: 14 boards, oil and spray paint on wood

Raymond Hains (1926–2005)
01. Untitled (1960)MixedMedia: torn posters on reclaimed metal plate
02. Palissade (1974)Mixed Media: 14 boards, oil and spray paint on wood

Raymond Hains (1926–2005)

01. Untitled (1960)
MixedMedia: torn posters on reclaimed metal plate

02. Palissade (1974)
Mixed Media: 14 boards, oil and spray paint on wood

Erving Goffman (1922–1982), a Canadian-born sociologist and writer, was considered the most influential American sociologist of the 20th century.
Goffman pioneered the study of face-to-face interaction — also known as micro-sociology, which he made famous in The Presentation of Self in Everyday Life. He used the imagery of the theatre to portray the importance of human and social action, which, he argued, are social performances that aim to give off and maintain certain desired impressions of the self to others. 
From a methodological perspective, Goffman often employed qualitative approaches, specifically ethnography, most famously in his study of social aspects of mental illness, in particular the functioning of total institutions and stigma.
A sociologist well-known for his analyses of human interaction, Erving Goffman relied less on formal scientific method than on observation to explain contemporary life. He wrote on subjects ranging from the way people behave in public to the different “forms” of talk — always from the point of view that every facet of human behaviour is “significant in the strategy and tactics of social struggle.”

Erving Goffman (1922–1982), a Canadian-born sociologist and writer, was considered the most influential American sociologist of the 20th century.

Goffman pioneered the study of face-to-face interaction — also known as micro-sociology, which he made famous in The Presentation of Self in Everyday Life. He used the imagery of the theatre to portray the importance of human and social action, which, he argued, are social performances that aim to give off and maintain certain desired impressions of the self to others. 

From a methodological perspective, Goffman often employed qualitative approaches, specifically ethnography, most famously in his study of social aspects of mental illness, in particular the functioning of total institutions and stigma.

A sociologist well-known for his analyses of human interaction, Erving Goffman relied less on formal scientific method than on observation to explain contemporary life. He wrote on subjects ranging from the way people behave in public to the different “forms” of talk — always from the point of view that every facet of human behaviour is “significant in the strategy and tactics of social struggle.”

Lorena Escalera Xtravaganza
(Mixed Media, 2014)
by Karen Miranda Augustine

Ink, spray paint, oil sticks, acrylic, paint marker, nail polish, necklace and nails 
on acetate and wood with metal frame, 36 x 16 inches

From my series PAINTED LOVE: Requiems of Salacious Sex Queens