Lorena Escalera Xtravaganza
(Mixed Media, 2014)
by Karen Miranda Augustine

Ink, spray paint, oil sticks, acrylic, paint marker, nail polish, necklace and nails 
on acetate and wood with metal frame, 36 x 16 inches

From my series PAINTED LOVE: Requiems of Salacious Sex Queens

Lorena Escalera Xtravaganza

"Genuine happiness involves sharing — your time, your wealth, and your energy. Psychologists have studied this exhaustively. An experience has far more lasting appeal than a new car or dress. I came to loathe the word ‘volunteer.’ What I’m talking about is solidarity and service, which have the power to transform and delight in a way that no purchase ever can. Roll up your sleeves, get involved, and get happy."

Photography by Delephine Diaw Diallofrom the Senegal: Magic Photo Studio series Photography by Delephine Diaw Diallofrom the Senegal: Magic Photo Studio series

Untitled (1961)
by Joan Mitchell

Oil on canvas, 226 x 205 cm

"In speaking of Mitchell, others tell us of her ‘physical materiality’ — how she exudes the visual sentiments of nature — the objectivity of her painting, devoid of anecdote or theatre and, in her own words, ‘to convey the feeling of the dying sunflower.’

Joan Mitchell as an abstract expressionist composes with long curvilinear strokes or broad stains of colour, contrasting warm and cool, often on unprimed canvases. Her perceptions enrich her work with a fascinating sense of the unfinished. Joan Mitchell demonstrated in painting — just as in life — anything can happen.”

Descansos/Roadside Memorials Descansos/Roadside Memorials Descansos/Roadside Memorials
blackcontemporaryart:

From Highness (2012)
hair: Joanne Petit-Frere photo: Delphine Diaw Diallo
blackcontemporaryart:

From Highness (2012)
hair: Joanne Petit-Frere photo: Delphine Diaw Diallo
blackcontemporaryart:

From Highness (2012)
hair: Joanne Petit-Frere photo: Delphine Diaw Diallo

blackcontemporaryart:

From Highness (2012)

hair: Joanne Petit-Frere 
photo: Delphine Diaw Diallo

u-Sathane Obomvu (Red Devil) from “Ghosts” — Ralph Ziman's beaded art project on the African arms trade
South African Bead Artists:Boas Manzvenga Panganai Phiri Lenon Tinarwo Telmore Masangudza Kennedy Mwashusha u-Sathane Obomvu (Red Devil) from “Ghosts” — Ralph Ziman's beaded art project on the African arms trade
South African Bead Artists:Boas Manzvenga Panganai Phiri Lenon Tinarwo Telmore Masangudza Kennedy Mwashusha u-Sathane Obomvu (Red Devil) from “Ghosts” — Ralph Ziman's beaded art project on the African arms trade
South African Bead Artists:Boas Manzvenga Panganai Phiri Lenon Tinarwo Telmore Masangudza Kennedy Mwashusha

u-Sathane Obomvu (Red Devil)
from “Ghosts” — Ralph Ziman's beaded art project on the African arms trade

South African Bead Artists:
Boas Manzvenga
Panganai Phiri
Lenon Tinarwo
Telmore Masangudza
Kennedy Mwashusha

Francesca Galliani Francesca Galliani
samsaranmusing:

Carved out of a single piece of Italian marble by Australian master sculptor Alex Seton.

samsaranmusing:

Carved out of a single piece of Italian marble by Australian master sculptor Alex Seton.

(via samsaranmusing-deactivated20140)

statues-and-monuments:

statues-and-monumentsTemple of Hathor, Dendera, Egypt 2011 by andrei deev 
statues-and-monuments:

statues-and-monumentsTemple of Hathor, Dendera, Egypt 2011 by andrei deev 
statues-and-monuments:

statues-and-monumentsTemple of Hathor, Dendera, Egypt 2011 by andrei deev 
statues-and-monuments:

statues-and-monumentsTemple of Hathor, Dendera, Egypt 2011 by andrei deev 
statues-and-monuments:

statues-and-monumentsTemple of Hathor, Dendera, Egypt 2011 by andrei deev 
statues-and-monuments:

statues-and-monumentsTemple of Hathor, Dendera, Egypt 2011 by andrei deev 
statues-and-monuments:

statues-and-monumentsTemple of Hathor, Dendera, Egypt 2011 by andrei deev 
statues-and-monuments:

statues-and-monumentsTemple of Hathor, Dendera, Egypt 2011 by andrei deev 
statues-and-monuments:

statues-and-monumentsTemple of Hathor, Dendera, Egypt 2011 by andrei deev 
statues-and-monuments:

statues-and-monumentsTemple of Hathor, Dendera, Egypt 2011 by andrei deev 

DISCOVER: Chests puffing up with pride — and happiness felt head to toe — are sensations as real as they are universal. And now we can make an atlas of them.
Researchers have long known that emotions are connected to a range of physiological changes, from nervous job candidates’ sweaty palms to the racing pulse that results from hearing a strange noise at night. But new research reveals that emotional states are universally associated with certain bodily sensations, regardless of individuals’ culture or language.
Once More With Feeling
More than 700 participants in Finland, Sweden and Taiwan participated in experiments aimed at mapping their bodily sensations in connection with specific emotions. Participants viewed emotion-laden words, videos, facial expressions and stories. They then self-reported areas of their bodies that felt different than before they’d viewed the material. By coloring in two computer-generated silhouettes — one to note areas of increased bodily sensation and the second to mark areas of decreased sensation — participants were able to provide researchers with a broad base of data showing both positive and negative bodily responses to different emotions.
Researchers found statistically discrete areas for each emotion tested, such as happiness, contempt and love, that were consistent regardless of respondents’ nationality. Afterward, researchers applied controls to reduce the risk that participants may have been biased by sensation-specific phrases common to many languages (such as the English “cold feet” as a metaphor for fear, reluctance or hesitation). The results are published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
Hot-Headed
Although each emotion produced a specific map of bodily sensation, researchers did identify some areas of overlap. Basic emotions, such as anger and fear, caused an increase in sensation in the upper chest area, likely corresponding to increases in pulse and respiration rate. Happiness was the only emotion tested that increased sensation all over the body.
The findings enhance researchers’ understanding of how we process emotions. Despite differences in culture and language, it appears our physical experience of feelings is remarkably consistent across different populations. The researchers believe that further development of these bodily sensation maps may one day result in a new way of identifying and treating emotional disorders.

DISCOVER: Chests puffing up with pride — and happiness felt head to toe — are sensations as real as they are universal. And now we can make an atlas of them.

Researchers have long known that emotions are connected to a range of physiological changes, from nervous job candidates’ sweaty palms to the racing pulse that results from hearing a strange noise at night. But new research reveals that emotional states are universally associated with certain bodily sensations, regardless of individuals’ culture or language.

Once More With Feeling

More than 700 participants in Finland, Sweden and Taiwan participated in experiments aimed at mapping their bodily sensations in connection with specific emotions. Participants viewed emotion-laden words, videos, facial expressions and stories. They then self-reported areas of their bodies that felt different than before they’d viewed the material. By coloring in two computer-generated silhouettes — one to note areas of increased bodily sensation and the second to mark areas of decreased sensation — participants were able to provide researchers with a broad base of data showing both positive and negative bodily responses to different emotions.

Researchers found statistically discrete areas for each emotion tested, such as happiness, contempt and love, that were consistent regardless of respondents’ nationality. Afterward, researchers applied controls to reduce the risk that participants may have been biased by sensation-specific phrases common to many languages (such as the English “cold feet” as a metaphor for fear, reluctance or hesitation). The results are published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Hot-Headed

Although each emotion produced a specific map of bodily sensation, researchers did identify some areas of overlap. Basic emotions, such as anger and fear, caused an increase in sensation in the upper chest area, likely corresponding to increases in pulse and respiration rate. Happiness was the only emotion tested that increased sensation all over the body.

The findings enhance researchers’ understanding of how we process emotions. Despite differences in culture and language, it appears our physical experience of feelings is remarkably consistent across different populations. The researchers believe that further development of these bodily sensation maps may one day result in a new way of identifying and treating emotional disorders.

(via samsaranmusing-deactivated20140)