artblackafrica:

Asad Faulwell draws attention to the women guerrilla combatants in Algeria’s War of Independence (1954-1962) through his work,”Les Femmes D’Alger”.
Faulwell was inspired by Gillo Pontecorvo’s film “The Battle of Algiers" (1966). In the movie, members of Algeria’s National Liberation Front (FLN) recruit three women to enact a terrorist attack in the French quarter of Algiers. "They recruited women because they could pass through check points without detection and would not raise suspicion when planting bombs," Faulwell explained.
Pontecorvo’s characters are based on real women: Djamila Bouhired, Zohra Drif and Hassiba Ben Bouali, all three of whom participated in the Algerian nationalist movement in the 1950s.

 ”In many ways these women were both victims and aggressors. They had killed civilians indiscriminately but they had also themselves been used by there countrymen and brutally tortured by the French. They exist in a moral grey area.”
"I wanted to create a version of the ‘Les Femmes D’Alger’ series that was more applicable to modern society than the Orientalist works of the 19th and 20th century," - Faulwell (via HuffPost)

artblackafrica:

Asad Faulwell draws attention to the women guerrilla combatants in Algeria’s War of Independence (1954-1962) through his work,”Les Femmes D’Alger”.
Faulwell was inspired by Gillo Pontecorvo’s film “The Battle of Algiers" (1966). In the movie, members of Algeria’s National Liberation Front (FLN) recruit three women to enact a terrorist attack in the French quarter of Algiers. "They recruited women because they could pass through check points without detection and would not raise suspicion when planting bombs," Faulwell explained.
Pontecorvo’s characters are based on real women: Djamila Bouhired, Zohra Drif and Hassiba Ben Bouali, all three of whom participated in the Algerian nationalist movement in the 1950s.

 ”In many ways these women were both victims and aggressors. They had killed civilians indiscriminately but they had also themselves been used by there countrymen and brutally tortured by the French. They exist in a moral grey area.”
"I wanted to create a version of the ‘Les Femmes D’Alger’ series that was more applicable to modern society than the Orientalist works of the 19th and 20th century," - Faulwell (via HuffPost)

artblackafrica:

Asad Faulwell draws attention to the women guerrilla combatants in Algeria’s War of Independence (1954-1962) through his work,”Les Femmes D’Alger”.
Faulwell was inspired by Gillo Pontecorvo’s film “The Battle of Algiers" (1966). In the movie, members of Algeria’s National Liberation Front (FLN) recruit three women to enact a terrorist attack in the French quarter of Algiers. "They recruited women because they could pass through check points without detection and would not raise suspicion when planting bombs," Faulwell explained.
Pontecorvo’s characters are based on real women: Djamila Bouhired, Zohra Drif and Hassiba Ben Bouali, all three of whom participated in the Algerian nationalist movement in the 1950s.

 ”In many ways these women were both victims and aggressors. They had killed civilians indiscriminately but they had also themselves been used by there countrymen and brutally tortured by the French. They exist in a moral grey area.”
"I wanted to create a version of the ‘Les Femmes D’Alger’ series that was more applicable to modern society than the Orientalist works of the 19th and 20th century," - Faulwell (via HuffPost)

artblackafrica:

Asad Faulwell draws attention to the women guerrilla combatants in Algeria’s War of Independence (1954-1962) through his work,”Les Femmes D’Alger”.
Faulwell was inspired by Gillo Pontecorvo’s film “The Battle of Algiers" (1966). In the movie, members of Algeria’s National Liberation Front (FLN) recruit three women to enact a terrorist attack in the French quarter of Algiers. "They recruited women because they could pass through check points without detection and would not raise suspicion when planting bombs," Faulwell explained.
Pontecorvo’s characters are based on real women: Djamila Bouhired, Zohra Drif and Hassiba Ben Bouali, all three of whom participated in the Algerian nationalist movement in the 1950s.

 ”In many ways these women were both victims and aggressors. They had killed civilians indiscriminately but they had also themselves been used by there countrymen and brutally tortured by the French. They exist in a moral grey area.”
"I wanted to create a version of the ‘Les Femmes D’Alger’ series that was more applicable to modern society than the Orientalist works of the 19th and 20th century," - Faulwell (via HuffPost)

artblackafrica:

Asad Faulwell draws attention to the women guerrilla combatants in Algeria’s War of Independence (1954-1962) through his work,”Les Femmes D’Alger”.
Faulwell was inspired by Gillo Pontecorvo’s film “The Battle of Algiers" (1966). In the movie, members of Algeria’s National Liberation Front (FLN) recruit three women to enact a terrorist attack in the French quarter of Algiers. "They recruited women because they could pass through check points without detection and would not raise suspicion when planting bombs," Faulwell explained.
Pontecorvo’s characters are based on real women: Djamila Bouhired, Zohra Drif and Hassiba Ben Bouali, all three of whom participated in the Algerian nationalist movement in the 1950s.

 ”In many ways these women were both victims and aggressors. They had killed civilians indiscriminately but they had also themselves been used by there countrymen and brutally tortured by the French. They exist in a moral grey area.”
"I wanted to create a version of the ‘Les Femmes D’Alger’ series that was more applicable to modern society than the Orientalist works of the 19th and 20th century," - Faulwell (via HuffPost)

artblackafrica:

Asad Faulwell draws attention to the women guerrilla combatants in Algeria’s War of Independence (1954-1962) through his work,Les Femmes D’Alger.

Faulwell was inspired by Gillo Pontecorvo’s film “The Battle of Algiers" (1966). In the movie, members of Algeria’s National Liberation Front (FLN) recruit three women to enact a terrorist attack in the French quarter of Algiers. "They recruited women because they could pass through check points without detection and would not raise suspicion when planting bombs," Faulwell explained.

Pontecorvo’s characters are based on real women: Djamila Bouhired, Zohra Drif and Hassiba Ben Bouali, all three of whom participated in the Algerian nationalist movement in the 1950s.

 ”In many ways these women were both victims and aggressors. They had killed civilians indiscriminately but they had also themselves been used by there countrymen and brutally tortured by the French. They exist in a moral grey area.”

"I wanted to create a version of the ‘Les Femmes D’Alger’ series that was more applicable to modern society than the Orientalist works of the 19th and 20th century," - Faulwell (via HuffPost)

(via dynamicafrica)

Karen Miranda Augustine

Andrea True 
(2014) Mixed Media

Spray paint, acrylic, paint marker, acetate, tire, ink, nail polish, beads, feathers, leather, metal hoop, Kanekalon
and American flag on vinyl record, sequins and canvas, 39 x 24 inches

from “Painted Love: Requiems for Salacious Sex Queens

Joseph SzaboPhotography
Joseph Szabo is a teacher, photographer, and author who began his photographic studies at Pratt Institute where he received an MFA in 1968.
He has been photographing his teen-age students for the past 25 years. As a high-school photography teacher, he takes seriously their pretentions, passions, and confusions, and he knows intimately how students put on, act up, behave, and misbehave.
As Cornell Capa says in his foreward, “Szabo’s camera is sharp, incisive, and young, matching his subjects. One can use many adjectives: revealing, tender, raucous, sexy, showy… in Szabo’s hands, the camera is magically there, the light is always available, the moment is perceived, seen, and caught.” Joseph SzaboPhotography
Joseph Szabo is a teacher, photographer, and author who began his photographic studies at Pratt Institute where he received an MFA in 1968.
He has been photographing his teen-age students for the past 25 years. As a high-school photography teacher, he takes seriously their pretentions, passions, and confusions, and he knows intimately how students put on, act up, behave, and misbehave.
As Cornell Capa says in his foreward, “Szabo’s camera is sharp, incisive, and young, matching his subjects. One can use many adjectives: revealing, tender, raucous, sexy, showy… in Szabo’s hands, the camera is magically there, the light is always available, the moment is perceived, seen, and caught.” Joseph SzaboPhotography
Joseph Szabo is a teacher, photographer, and author who began his photographic studies at Pratt Institute where he received an MFA in 1968.
He has been photographing his teen-age students for the past 25 years. As a high-school photography teacher, he takes seriously their pretentions, passions, and confusions, and he knows intimately how students put on, act up, behave, and misbehave.
As Cornell Capa says in his foreward, “Szabo’s camera is sharp, incisive, and young, matching his subjects. One can use many adjectives: revealing, tender, raucous, sexy, showy… in Szabo’s hands, the camera is magically there, the light is always available, the moment is perceived, seen, and caught.” Joseph SzaboPhotography
Joseph Szabo is a teacher, photographer, and author who began his photographic studies at Pratt Institute where he received an MFA in 1968.
He has been photographing his teen-age students for the past 25 years. As a high-school photography teacher, he takes seriously their pretentions, passions, and confusions, and he knows intimately how students put on, act up, behave, and misbehave.
As Cornell Capa says in his foreward, “Szabo’s camera is sharp, incisive, and young, matching his subjects. One can use many adjectives: revealing, tender, raucous, sexy, showy… in Szabo’s hands, the camera is magically there, the light is always available, the moment is perceived, seen, and caught.”

Joseph Szabo
Photography

Joseph Szabo is a teacher, photographer, and author who began his photographic studies at Pratt Institute where he received an MFA in 1968.

He has been photographing his teen-age students for the past 25 years. As a high-school photography teacher, he takes seriously their pretentions, passions, and confusions, and he knows intimately how students put on, act up, behave, and misbehave.

As Cornell Capa says in his foreward, “Szabo’s camera is sharp, incisive, and young, matching his subjects. One can use many adjectives: revealing, tender, raucous, sexy, showy… in Szabo’s hands, the camera is magically there, the light is always available, the moment is perceived, seen, and caught.”

"This website is a resource for people who are interested in the role of the psychopomp, primarily as a guide to the afterlife, and how these archetypal figures can help people through such important transitions as death. It contains information about what a psychopomp is, how psychopomps have been portrayed in the images, myths, and sacred stories of cultures throughout time, and why psychopomps still have an important role to play in today’s spiritually and culturally diverse world.

It also serves as a resource for those who are actively working as a psychopomp, death midwife, death doula, or guide to the afterlife and may be looking for additional resources and information, or may be seeking ways to connect with others who are doing this important work.

The site was developed by Laura Strong, PhD, who has done extensive research into the myths and stories of psychopomps from around the world, and has been using her own psychopomp skills for many years.”

Tony Fitzpatrick
Mixed media from “A Map of Touches” (2009)
Ghost RosarySilver RosaryYellow Cab Rosary
“People always ask Tony Fitzpatrick if he’s an artist who writes poetry or a poet who makes art. ‘Both,’ he always answers. 
‘Sometimes I build a beautiful home for a poem,’ the Chicago-based artist says, ‘sometimes the poem is a function of drawing; always the work serves the same thing. A great poem is a better monument than a cathedral.’
In the ’80s Fitzpatrick became known as a printmaker, etching spectral portraits of pop figures and imaginative creatures — Susan Atkins and Richard Speck, Kitten Natividad and Seka, she-wolves and rat men, the Bambino — work that has found a home in the Art Institute of Chicago and the Museum of Modern Art in New York, among other places. Fitzpatrick set these portraits alongside his own poems in short-run chapbooks beloved by collectors. 
In the late ’90s his father, James, was diagnosed with skin cancer, and Fitzpatrick began combining artifacts from their lives together—like Chicago White Sox tickets and candy wrappers—with the paper memories his father saved in a cigar box: matchbooks, gambling slips, naked-lady playing cards. 
Fitzpatrick’s poems, too, then entered his pictures and have, most recently, anchored his creations, defying (typifying) the boundary lines between his work as a poet and as an artist. The results are astral combinations of drawing, collage, and poetry, haunted by clippings from lost cities. 
[These works] are ‘for unknown women and known women, for better and for worse, all out of heartbreak,’ he says. These are, in effect, love poems composed from pieces: ‘Her / body / a / revelation / and / map / of / touches.’” Tony Fitzpatrick
Mixed media from “A Map of Touches” (2009)
Ghost RosarySilver RosaryYellow Cab Rosary
“People always ask Tony Fitzpatrick if he’s an artist who writes poetry or a poet who makes art. ‘Both,’ he always answers. 
‘Sometimes I build a beautiful home for a poem,’ the Chicago-based artist says, ‘sometimes the poem is a function of drawing; always the work serves the same thing. A great poem is a better monument than a cathedral.’
In the ’80s Fitzpatrick became known as a printmaker, etching spectral portraits of pop figures and imaginative creatures — Susan Atkins and Richard Speck, Kitten Natividad and Seka, she-wolves and rat men, the Bambino — work that has found a home in the Art Institute of Chicago and the Museum of Modern Art in New York, among other places. Fitzpatrick set these portraits alongside his own poems in short-run chapbooks beloved by collectors. 
In the late ’90s his father, James, was diagnosed with skin cancer, and Fitzpatrick began combining artifacts from their lives together—like Chicago White Sox tickets and candy wrappers—with the paper memories his father saved in a cigar box: matchbooks, gambling slips, naked-lady playing cards. 
Fitzpatrick’s poems, too, then entered his pictures and have, most recently, anchored his creations, defying (typifying) the boundary lines between his work as a poet and as an artist. The results are astral combinations of drawing, collage, and poetry, haunted by clippings from lost cities. 
[These works] are ‘for unknown women and known women, for better and for worse, all out of heartbreak,’ he says. These are, in effect, love poems composed from pieces: ‘Her / body / a / revelation / and / map / of / touches.’” Tony Fitzpatrick
Mixed media from “A Map of Touches” (2009)
Ghost RosarySilver RosaryYellow Cab Rosary
“People always ask Tony Fitzpatrick if he’s an artist who writes poetry or a poet who makes art. ‘Both,’ he always answers. 
‘Sometimes I build a beautiful home for a poem,’ the Chicago-based artist says, ‘sometimes the poem is a function of drawing; always the work serves the same thing. A great poem is a better monument than a cathedral.’
In the ’80s Fitzpatrick became known as a printmaker, etching spectral portraits of pop figures and imaginative creatures — Susan Atkins and Richard Speck, Kitten Natividad and Seka, she-wolves and rat men, the Bambino — work that has found a home in the Art Institute of Chicago and the Museum of Modern Art in New York, among other places. Fitzpatrick set these portraits alongside his own poems in short-run chapbooks beloved by collectors. 
In the late ’90s his father, James, was diagnosed with skin cancer, and Fitzpatrick began combining artifacts from their lives together—like Chicago White Sox tickets and candy wrappers—with the paper memories his father saved in a cigar box: matchbooks, gambling slips, naked-lady playing cards. 
Fitzpatrick’s poems, too, then entered his pictures and have, most recently, anchored his creations, defying (typifying) the boundary lines between his work as a poet and as an artist. The results are astral combinations of drawing, collage, and poetry, haunted by clippings from lost cities. 
[These works] are ‘for unknown women and known women, for better and for worse, all out of heartbreak,’ he says. These are, in effect, love poems composed from pieces: ‘Her / body / a / revelation / and / map / of / touches.’”

Tony Fitzpatrick

Mixed media from “A Map of Touches” (2009)

Ghost Rosary
Silver Rosary
Yellow Cab Rosary

“People always ask Tony Fitzpatrick if he’s an artist who writes poetry or a poet who makes art. ‘Both,’ he always answers. 

‘Sometimes I build a beautiful home for a poem,’ the Chicago-based artist says, ‘sometimes the poem is a function of drawing; always the work serves the same thing. A great poem is a better monument than a cathedral.’

In the ’80s Fitzpatrick became known as a printmaker, etching spectral portraits of pop figures and imaginative creatures — Susan Atkins and Richard Speck, Kitten Natividad and Seka, she-wolves and rat men, the Bambino — work that has found a home in the Art Institute of Chicago and the Museum of Modern Art in New York, among other places. Fitzpatrick set these portraits alongside his own poems in short-run chapbooks beloved by collectors. 

In the late ’90s his father, James, was diagnosed with skin cancer, and Fitzpatrick began combining artifacts from their lives together—like Chicago White Sox tickets and candy wrappers—with the paper memories his father saved in a cigar box: matchbooks, gambling slips, naked-lady playing cards. 

Fitzpatrick’s poems, too, then entered his pictures and have, most recently, anchored his creations, defying (typifying) the boundary lines between his work as a poet and as an artist. The results are astral combinations of drawing, collage, and poetry, haunted by clippings from lost cities. 

[These works] are ‘for unknown women and known women, for better and for worse, all out of heartbreak,’ he says. These are, in effect, love poems composed from pieces: ‘Her / body / a / revelation / and / map / of / touches.’”

Marcia Jones
The DoctorMy Body Marcia Jones
The DoctorMy Body

The Phantom World: Philosophy of Spirits, Apparitions
by Augustin Calmet (1850)

Contents of the First Volume:   

I. The Appearance of Good Angels proved by the Books of the Old Testament

II. The Appearance of Good Angels proved by the Books of the New Testament

III. Under what form have Good Angels appeared 

IV. Opinions of the Jews, Christians, Mahometans, and Oriental Nations, concerning the Apparitions of Good Angels

V. Opinion of the Greeks and Romans on the Apparitions of Good Genii

VI. The Apparition of Bad Angels proved by the Holy Scriptures — Under what Form they have appeared

VII. Of Magic

VIII. Objections to the Reality of Magic

IX. Reply to the Objections

X. Examination of the Affair of Hocque, Magician 

XL. Magic of the Egyptians and Chaldeans

XII. Magic among the Greeks and Romans

XIII. Examples which prove the Reality of Magic

XIV. Effects of Magic according to the Poets

XY. Of the Pagan Oracles 

XVI. The Certainty of the Event predicted, not always a proof that the Prediction conies from God

XVII. Reasons which lead us to believe that the greater part of the Ancient Oracles were only Impositions of the Priests and Priestesses, who feigned that they were inspired by God

XVIII. Of Sorcerers and Sorceresses, or Witches

XIX. Instances of Sorcerers and “Witches being, as they said, transported to the Sabbath

XX. Story of Louis Gaufredi and Magdalen de la Palud, owned by themselves to be a Sorcerer and Sorceress

XXI. Reasons which prove the Possibility of Sorcerers and Witches being transported to the Sabbath

XXII. Continuation of the same Subject

XXIII. Obsession and Possession of the Devil

XXIV. The Truth and Reality of Possession and Obsession by the Devil proved from Scripture

XXV. Examples of Real Possessions caused by the Devil

XXVI. Continuation of the same Subject

XXVII. Objections against the Obsessions and Possessions of the Demon — Reply to the Objections

XXVIII. Continuation of Objections against Possessions and some Replies to those Objections

XXIX. Of Familiar Spirits

XXX. Some other Examples of Elves

XXXI. Spirits that keep watch over Treasure

XXXII. Other instances of Hidden Treasures, which were guarded by Good or Bad Spirits

XXXIII. Spectres which appear, and predict things unknown and to come

XXXIV. Other Apparitions of Spectres 230

XXXV. Examination of the Apparition of a pretended Spectre

XXXVI. Of Spectres which haunt Houses

XXXYIL Other Instances of Spectres which haunt certain Houses 

XXXYIII. Prodigious effects of Imagination in those Men or Women who believe they hold Intercourse with the Demon

XXXIX. Eeturn and Apparitions of Souls after the Death of the Body, proved from Scripture

XL. Apparitions of Spirits proved from History

XLI. More Instances of Apparitions

XLII. On the Apparitions of Spirits who imprint their Hands on Clothes or on Wood

XLIII. Opinions of the Jews, Greeks, and Latins, concerning the Dead who are left unburied

XLIV. Examination of what is required or revealed to the Living by the Dead who return to Earth  

XLV. Apparitions of Men still alive, to other living Men, absent, and very distant from each other

XLVI. Arguments concerning Apparitions 

XLVII. Objections against Apparitions, and Keplies to those Objections

XLVIII. Some other Objections and Replies 

XLIX. The Secrets of Physics and Chemistry taken for supernatural things 

L. Conclusion of the Treatise on Apparitions

LI. Way of explaining Apparitions 

LII. The difficulty of explaining the manner in which Apparitions make their appearance, whatever system may be proposed on the subject

Brian Jungen

Skull
2006–2009
Mixed Media: Baseballs, softballs, 18.4 x 15.2 x 25.4 cm

Alexey Titarenko
Saint Petersburg (1992–94)Gelatin silver prints  Alexey Titarenko
Saint Petersburg (1992–94)Gelatin silver prints  Alexey Titarenko
Saint Petersburg (1992–94)Gelatin silver prints 

Alexey Titarenko

Saint Petersburg (1992–94)
Gelatin silver prints 

Marisol

The Family (1969)
Wood, plastic, neon, glass

studiomuseum:

Wangechi Mutu: A Fantastic Journey at Nasher Museum at Duke University | March 21 - July 21, 2013
Images (from top): Once upon a time she said, I’m not afraid and her enemies became afraid of her The End (2013) / Yo Mama (2003) / Misguided Little Unforgivable Hierarchies (2005) /  (L to R): Riding Death in My Sleep (2002) / Root of All Eves (2010) / The Bride Who Married a Camel’s Head (2009)
studiomuseum:

Wangechi Mutu: A Fantastic Journey at Nasher Museum at Duke University | March 21 - July 21, 2013
Images (from top): Once upon a time she said, I’m not afraid and her enemies became afraid of her The End (2013) / Yo Mama (2003) / Misguided Little Unforgivable Hierarchies (2005) /  (L to R): Riding Death in My Sleep (2002) / Root of All Eves (2010) / The Bride Who Married a Camel’s Head (2009)
studiomuseum:

Wangechi Mutu: A Fantastic Journey at Nasher Museum at Duke University | March 21 - July 21, 2013
Images (from top): Once upon a time she said, I’m not afraid and her enemies became afraid of her The End (2013) / Yo Mama (2003) / Misguided Little Unforgivable Hierarchies (2005) /  (L to R): Riding Death in My Sleep (2002) / Root of All Eves (2010) / The Bride Who Married a Camel’s Head (2009)
studiomuseum:

Wangechi Mutu: A Fantastic Journey at Nasher Museum at Duke University | March 21 - July 21, 2013
Images (from top): Once upon a time she said, I’m not afraid and her enemies became afraid of her The End (2013) / Yo Mama (2003) / Misguided Little Unforgivable Hierarchies (2005) /  (L to R): Riding Death in My Sleep (2002) / Root of All Eves (2010) / The Bride Who Married a Camel’s Head (2009)
studiomuseum:

Wangechi Mutu: A Fantastic Journey at Nasher Museum at Duke University | March 21 - July 21, 2013
Images (from top): Once upon a time she said, I’m not afraid and her enemies became afraid of her The End (2013) / Yo Mama (2003) / Misguided Little Unforgivable Hierarchies (2005) /  (L to R): Riding Death in My Sleep (2002) / Root of All Eves (2010) / The Bride Who Married a Camel’s Head (2009)
studiomuseum:

Wangechi Mutu: A Fantastic Journey at Nasher Museum at Duke University | March 21 - July 21, 2013
Images (from top): Once upon a time she said, I’m not afraid and her enemies became afraid of her The End (2013) / Yo Mama (2003) / Misguided Little Unforgivable Hierarchies (2005) /  (L to R): Riding Death in My Sleep (2002) / Root of All Eves (2010) / The Bride Who Married a Camel’s Head (2009)

studiomuseum:

Wangechi Mutu: A Fantastic Journey at Nasher Museum at Duke University | March 21 - July 21, 2013

Images (from top): Once upon a time she said, I’m not afraid and her enemies became afraid of her The End (2013) / Yo Mama (2003) / Misguided Little Unforgivable Hierarchies (2005) /  (L to R): Riding Death in My Sleep (2002) / Root of All Eves (2010) / The Bride Who Married a Camel’s Head (2009)

(via quirkyblackgirls)

Karen Miranda-Rivadeneira

Mom curing me from the evil eye circa 1990.

Abdul Mati Klarwein

Bavarian Angel (1970)
Mische technique (layers of oil and tempera on primed canvas)

50 x 50 cm